Posts Tagged “restaurants”

Why a Gamified Loyalty Program Keeps Me Coming Back to Buffalo Wild Wings®

Last night the Golden State Warriors defeated the Cleveland Cavaliers 113-91 in Game 1 of the NBA Finals. As a result, I’ll be watching Game 2 at Buffalo Wild Wings.

The last time I visited the chicken wing/sports bar concept I played the Spin & Win game on the Blazin’ Rewards app. This is a gamified component of the brand’s loyalty program and members like myself have an opportunity to play every time they visit during the NBA postseason. Each visit allows one “spin” in the app. Every spin reveals a team with an upcoming playoff game. If that team wins its next game, the guest earns 100 bonus points towards a reward.

When I played during a lunch visit earlier in the week, my spin landed on the Warriors. When they won last night, I earned 100 points, giving me enough currency to earn a free entrée. Now I can’t wait to go back for Game 2 this weekend so I can redeem my reward and play again to give myself a shot at 100 more points. […]

How to Capitalize on Sports Fandom — Even If You’re Not a Sports Bar

How do sports impact restaurants — and even the revenue of non-sports-theme restaurants? Here are a few quick statistics: When Lebron James returned to Cleveland and the Cavaliers, the city saw a 30%-200% increase in local restaurant revenue.

His return boosted restaurant revenue all year long, including during winter, Cleveland’s traditional restaurant off-season.

Experts estimate that his return was worth $500 million to the city of Cleveland.

Sports mean big money for the restaurant industry — with or without your city’s own Lebron James.

But it’s likely that if you’re not a sports bar or sports-themed restaurant, you may have viewed sports promotions as outside of your purview. Not only is that a mistake, but it’s a costly one.

The sports industry is worth $73 billion and growing. In a nutshell, there are four ways to take advantage […]

Saying “My Pleasure” Instead of “You’re Welcome”

Woman working in restaurant taking payment from customerAfter waiting patiently, you finally order your 8-count of nuggets, small waffle fries, and sweet tea. You pull up to pay at the window, receive your food, and ask for extra Polynesian sauce. Before pulling out of the drive-thru lane, you say, “Thank you,” and the worker responds, “My pleasure.”

For 70 years now, one of America’s most loved fast-food restaurants has been raising the bar on word choice and customer service. Chick-fil-A, “Home of the Original Chicken Sandwich,” has made the phrase “my pleasure” a critical element of customer interactions, favoring it over the more common […]

Geofencing Explained

Every marketer has the goal of compelling their customers to live up to their potential. Whether that is through peer measurement tactics like running a tiered loyalty program, or individual competition tactics like a visit challenge, there are many ways to drive more visits and spend. One element that many marketers fail to consider, however, is geographic potential. What exactly does that mean? Let’s dive in.geofencing w caption_edited-1

Geographic Potential

Geographic potential is the highest frequency with which a customer can visit your restaurant or retail locations based on their proximity to them. Marketers might think they have the geographic information they need about their customers because they ask for an address when a customer registers for their loyalty program. While most customers will probably provide their home address, does that really paint the full picture of their geographic whereabouts? Of course not! If you want to capitalize on the geographic potential of your audience, you need to paint the full picture of where they are spending their time. Say a member of your loyalty program – let’s call him Joe – provides his home address when he signs up for your program. You have a location one mile away from Joe’s address, and you send him lunch offers on a regular basis, but he never redeems them. What gives? It turns out that Joe works 20 miles away from where he lives, so he is never in the area around lunch time. A better use of marketing resources would be to send him dinner offers. […]