Convert Fuel-Only Customers into In-Store Loyalists

On average about 300 people visit a store’s gas pumps a day, but only 35 percent of those customers step foot in the store. The opportunity to compel store visits is palpable – you are not unlike other marketers who dream of solving this dilemma. We all know that margin, for the most part, lives in the store, not at the pump. Which is why converting fuel customers to frequent in-store patrons is like the brass ring of convenience store marketing.

For years, marketers have tried to solve this challenge. Some send the same ‘buy one coffee get one free’ offer to all customers and then hope it pulls them in. Others have invested in expensive pump displays, point of purchase material and more to convert that customer. There is even a group that has given up trying to convert them – leaving room for competitors to grab their customers instead. There is a better way to motivate store visits.

Use an individual’s purchase data to compel in-store sales. […]

The Greatest Potential for Improvement

At this year’s PXUX I lead about 75 people in a paper airplane making experiment. With simple instructions, “just make a paper airplane that can fly the furthest – no balls of paper” the crowd stepped up to the line one by one to see their work take flight. They were highly competitive.

The shortest distance was actually minus about two feet as the craft took a quick turn in the opposite direction, if you can believe it. The longest distance was about thirty feet. Nearly twenty percent of the aeronautical wonders made it at least twenty feet, while the lion’s share of them made it between one foot and twenty feet. Check out the picture to the left.

I then posed the question, “if you had 15 seconds to choose a paper airplane that was not yours, modify it and launch it, and then measure how much further (or less far) it flew than last time, which would you pick? What if I paid you $10 for every foot further that it goes than last time? And, you have to pay $5 per foot if it doesn’t go as far as last time. Which piece of folded paper would you pick to improve?”  […]

Lessons from Coalition Loyalty Programs

Coalition loyalty programs have been suffering lately. Since their beginning coalition programs set out to create a single loyalty program that connects multiple retailers and brands throughout various industries. The thought behind these programs was if one loyalty program could be used throughout multiple brands that would help the whole and get more customer loyalty across all participating brands.

But recently things do not look like they are working as intended and coalition programs, like the Plenti® program, have an uncertain future. With multiple brands deciding to branch out and create their own branded loyalty program, it looks like coalition programs are nearing the end of their days.

So, what lessons can be learned from the rise and fall of coalition loyalty programs? […]

Why Customer Experience is Always an Uphill Battle: 5 Marketing Lessons from Miley Cyrus

If you have a teenage daughter or follow Liam Hemsworth’s life, then you probably recognize the title of this blog, which was inspired by “The Climb,” one of the many Miley Cyrus hit songs. I’m going to let you in on a little secret: Miley Cyrus is a marketing genius. But you don’t have to take my word for it – Business Insider, Huffington Post, and Entrepreneur Magazine all know that Miley Cyrus has some serious marketing chops.

 

Below are five lessons any marketer can take from Miley and apply to their own brand.

 

78% of millennials prefer experiences over things

"There's always gonna be another mountain,
I'm always gonna wanna make it move,
Always gonna be an uphill battle,
Sometimes I'm gonna have to lose."

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1. Create an Experience for Your Guests - Miley Cyrus doesn’t just sing in front of a microphone on stage. In true pop culture fashion, her concertgoers are immersed in an overstimulating, audio-visual experience that includes synchronized dancing, elaborate props, costume changes, and much more. This is because Miley understands that 78% of millennials prefer experiences over things.* She leverages the tools at her disposal to create the best experience for her fans. *Source: Eventbrite
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