Archive for the “Restaurant Marketing” Category

How Chick-fil-A® Rewards its Best Guests Without Sacrificing Profit

There’s an interesting problem that restaurants with loyalty programs face. All of the behavioral data gleaned from these programs means that restaurants can easily identify their best customers: the people who spend the most and visit most frequently. And that’s very useful for creating profitable campaigns.

Running unsegmented promotions can cannibalize profit because your best guests will receive the same promotion as your less frequent customers. Your best guests are going to come in anyway, and discounting purchases they were already going to make can hurt profits.

Discounts and promotions designed to drive revenue should only […]

Your Campaign Results Might Be Lying to You

The only way to know if your loyalty or other guest-engagement campaigns are succeeding is to track them and analyze your results. Unfortunately, even numbers that appear straightforward can contain hidden implications.

Depending on how you look at your data, a campaign can seem like a roaring success or a misfire. But sometimes it requires further analysis to determine if your initial assessments are accurate.

In worst-case scenarios, you may discover that a campaign you decide to run again based on previous positive data had been a misfire the entire time. Not only are you producing unfavorable results, but you are also wasting time, manpower, and money.

For example, let’s say you set up a “We Miss You” campaign. These are fairly common loyalty program campaigns in which you send out an offer to people who have not visited your stores in a while to encourage them to return. After deciding that you’re going to set up a campaign for people who have not visited in 60 days, you send them a coupon for 15 percent off an entrée.

Once you’ve run the campaign and examined your results, the numbers look great. Many guests who had not visited in 60 days made visits during the campaign period and used the coupon you sent them. It seems like the campaign was a resounding success!

But was it truly successful? Sometimes results in campaigns like this are deceiving. […]

What Chipotle Did Right (and Wrong) in Its First-Ever Loyalty Program

For a quite a while, Chipotle executives didn’t believe loyalty programs were for them. In fact, Mark Crumpacker, CCO/CDO of Chipotle, said in September 2015*, “We don’t believe the general supposition that loyalty will make less frequent customers more frequent.”

However, from the fourth quarter of 2015 into the early second quarter of 2016, Chipotle had a few health scares that contributed to its stock prices — and sales — to take a tumble.

In summer 2016, Chipotle was ready to rethink its stance on loyalty programs and launched its Chiptopia Summer Rewards, a three-month tiered loyalty program.

It’s reasonable to assume, based on the structure of the program (that we’ll cover next) and the business challenges they were experiencing, that
Chipotle’s motivation in creating its loyalty program was to increase visits.

Note: Before we go any further, we want to make it clear that Chipotle is not a client of Paytronix. This blog post is designed to analyze the Chiptopia program, share what worked and what didn’t, and help you think — or rethink — your own loyalty program.

The Chipotle Loyalty Program Structure: How It Worked

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Millennials Want These Three Things from a Reward Program

Your brand needs to connect with millennials now – it’s crucial to the future of your business. At over 75 million strong, millennials dominate the U.S. population. This generation, born between 1980 and 1996, holds around $1.3 trillion in spending power, according to Boston Consulting Group, and they haven’t even reached maximum earning power…yet.

The age gap in the millennial generation is the root of many marketing communication challenges. The 20-year olds could be at college with irregular daily schedules, limited budgets, and a single relationship status. While on the other end of the spectrum, 36-year old millennials are likely to be married homeowners with children. Do individuals from age 20 to age 36 have enough common characteristics to be lumped together as a single target audience?

Researchers commonly note […]