Archive for the “Guest Engagement” Category

Guest Engagement Lessons from Restaurants

The convenience store industry is going through a transformation where retailers are becoming competitors in the foodservice space, but there is still a lot that c-stores can learn from restaurants when it comes to customer engagement. By learning more about their customers and leveraging the data, c-stores can build loyalty and earn increased visits and spend from their customers.

How can c-stores achieve the level of customer engagement that restaurants have been able to get? There is a shift in the way brands think about their marketing, moving from category-centric to customer-centric, meaning instead of thinking about how to sell more of a product you think about who is buying those products. A customer-centric approach still revolves around selling more products, but it also means delving into who is buying them and why.

To move to a customer-centric approach, c-store marketers need to think about three main things: […]

Speak With Authority. Use Your Data.

It’s never wise to blindly follow someone just because they speak with authority. You expect them to be able to support their position with more than anecdotal evidence. Paytronix works overtime, gathering and segmenting customer data to inform your decisions, so you can present your campaign and promotion ideas with authority.

When you create account filters in the Paytronix Campaign Center, you can segment your customers and guests in more than 50 different dimensions. There are Activity choices that include the guest’s last activity date, their gift card expiration, the store used and much more. You can select based on Enrollment data, like date, store, or source, or filter based on Profile information like age, postal code, or anniversary date. Based on the traditional 80/20 rule, however, we suspect most of our end users are only taking advantage of a subset of what we make available. With so many options, it’s not surprising. Today there’s one dimension that we’d like you to take a closer look at—Scoring.   […]

Convert Fuel-Only Customers into In-Store Loyalists

On average about 300 people visit a store’s gas pumps a day, but only 35 percent of those customers step foot in the store. The opportunity to compel store visits is palpable – you are not unlike other marketers who dream of solving this dilemma. We all know that margin, for the most part, lives in the store, not at the pump. Which is why converting fuel customers to frequent in-store patrons is like the brass ring of convenience store marketing.

For years, marketers have tried to solve this challenge. Some send the same ‘buy one coffee get one free’ offer to all customers and then hope it pulls them in. Others have invested in expensive pump displays, point of purchase material and more to convert that customer. There is even a group that has given up trying to convert them – leaving room for competitors to grab their customers instead. There is a better way to motivate store visits.

Use an individual’s purchase data to compel in-store sales. […]

The Greatest Potential for Improvement

At this year’s PXUX I lead about 75 people in a paper airplane making experiment. With simple instructions, “just make a paper airplane that can fly the furthest – no balls of paper” the crowd stepped up to the line one by one to see their work take flight. They were highly competitive.

The shortest distance was actually minus about two feet as the craft took a quick turn in the opposite direction, if you can believe it. The longest distance was about thirty feet. Nearly twenty percent of the aeronautical wonders made it at least twenty feet, while the lion’s share of them made it between one foot and twenty feet. Check out the picture to the left.

I then posed the question, “if you had 15 seconds to choose a paper airplane that was not yours, modify it and launch it, and then measure how much further (or less far) it flew than last time, which would you pick? What if I paid you $10 for every foot further that it goes than last time? And, you have to pay $5 per foot if it doesn’t go as far as last time. Which piece of folded paper would you pick to improve?”  […]